Miscellaneous Reviews Festivals Lists Etc
#
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
Here


Site Meter

 

The Films of Frank Oz

The Muppets Take Manhattan

Little Shop of Horrors

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

What About Bob?

HouseSitter

The Indian in the Cupboard

In & Out

Bowfinger

The Score

The Stepford Wives

Death at a Funeral (January 31/10)

Directed by Frank Oz, Death at a Funeral follows several characters (including Matthew Macfadyen's Daniel, Andy Nyman's Howard, and Alan Tudyk's Simon) as they converge on a country estate after Daniel's father passes away - with problems ensuing as a stranger (Peter Dinklage's Peter) arrives on the scene armed with some rather shocking news about the deceased. Oz has infused Death at a Funeral with a pervasively affable atmosphere that effectively compensates for the less-than-hilarious nature of the movie's opening half hour, with the likeable vibe perpetuated by an eclectic selection of characters that are drawn into a series of increasingly off-the-wall situations (ie Simon accidentally consumes a hallucinogenic, Howard must contend with Peter Vaughan's crotchety Uncle Alfie, etc). The progressively go-for-broke bent of Dean Craig's screenplay ensures that the film only improves as it goes along, as the steady emphasis on farcical elements translates into a laugh-out-loud funny third act that's rife with comedic misunderstandings and complications. There's little doubt that a big measure of Death at a Funeral's success is due to the efforts of a uniformly impressive cast, with Macfadyen's solid work as the movie's straight man matched by an eclectic band of supporting characters (and as effective as folks like Nyman and Tudyk are here, it's clear that Dinklage earns the title of MVP). The final result is an ingratiating bit of energetic silliness that'll surely delight fans of British comedy, although it's worth noting that Oz does a superb job of ensuring that the proceedings remain accessible for all audiences.

out of

© David Nusair